24 blue is the warmest color ending meaning Advanced Guide

24 blue is the warmest color ending meaning Advanced Guide

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Blue Is the Warmest Colour [1]

Blue Is the Warmest Colour (French: La Vie d’Adèle – Chapitres 1 & 2, lit. ‘The Life of Adèle: Chapters 1 & 2’; French pronunciation: [la vi dadɛl ʃapitʁ œ̃n‿e dø]) is a 2013 romantic drama film co-written, co-produced, and directed by Abdellatif Kechiche and starring Léa Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulos
It depicts their relationship from Adèle’s high school years to her early adult life and career as a schoolteacher. The film’s premise is based on the 2010 graphic novel of the same name by Jul Maroh.[6]
Approximately 800 hours of footage were shot, including extensive B-roll footage, with Kechiche trimming the final cut to 180 minutes.[7] The film generated controversy,[8] much of it about allegations by the crew and lead actresses of poor working conditions on set and the film’s raw depiction of sexuality.[9][10][11]. At the 2013 Cannes Film Festival, the film unanimously won the Palme d’Or from the official jury and the FIPRESCI Prize

CRITICAL VIEWING: BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR [2]

Blue is the Warmest Color (2013) is a movie that changed the film industry. This movie was considered controversial due to its erotic scenes and taboo storyline
It follows them through multiple years and through separation. This movie has won many awards and recognition for its acting and cinematography
The movie, Blue Is The Warmest Color, is the main subject of this evaluation, and can be found on Netflix.. The movie focuses on a shy 17-year-old high-school girl, Adèle

Your Film Professor [3]

I have to confess that I wrestled with what to say about the wonderful Blue is the Warmest Color (2013, Abdellatif Kechiche); that is, I knew I wanted to write about it – it is one of those films that stayed with me after I screened it – but every time I sat down to write my thoughts, words eluded me. To break through this I thought I might try a different approach and look at some of the provocative images and intertextual references in the film and comment on them as I go
However, because this film is just so rich in intertextual intersections, I can only get to some of these references here, my hope being that I can interject an analysis that becomes part of the dialectal unpacking of this multilayered film.. In this early wonderful image, Adèle’s reflection not only already informs us of — punctuates visually — her lack of a fixed Self (her fragmented Self), but in the third image of her fading out, we see how fragile identity is, especially for young people, as various influences act to move identity in many different directions, sometimes in unhealthy directions (more on this in a moment).
This sense of disconnect from the world around her — and her Self — is magnified by two key signifiers in this image, the bench itself, which speaks to the place where other people could be (e.g., the void of no people sitting with her gets hyper-emphasized, speaks to the lack of real bonded connections in her life) and that she is sitting perpendicular to the bench suggests that she is already going against the norms of society.. In this important sequence, we get our first stress on the crucial class focus in the film, Adèle seeming to have at least this possibility for a substantive identity formation, the blue motif here (the blue smoke that issues from the cans, apparently their activist color marker) then suggesting another meaning for the color blue, signaling Adèle’s potential for agency and activism in her life, which we see again later when she joins in the LBGTQ rights march, all of which plays into the key Sartrean focus of existentialism, these activist marches signifying a way for Others to enact their own identity and not let other (ideological, cultural, societal, personal) influences dictate Self (more on this crucial element below)

Blue is the Warmest Color [4]

I’ve been cheated on so I am biased and I related more to Emma’s pain than Adele’s. However, this movie is very subjective and leaves a lot of unanswered questions because 3 hrs isn’t enough or Kechiche just wants to pick our brains
http://s1.zetaboards.com/L_Anon/topic/5143411/1036/. We are watching a movie in which we the audience are given the ability to observe
We know her parents believe she must marry a man with a job.. When we go forward in time we find Adele is a closeted person still and living in 3 different environments.

‘Blue Is the Warmest Color’ Is the Film That Showed Me What I Fear [5]

Sometimes what I like to do is recall all my shatteringly painful life experiences. Often, my go-to is the time—while attending university in a grim coastal town—that I got my head kicked in outside a club by a balding, middle-aged thug in front of my then girlfriend
My mind also occasionally returns to 1994—a youthful, more optimistic time in my life—when my dad took me to watch Chelsea vs. I was ten and Chelsea hadn’t won a trophy in 23 years
My nether regions swelled up to grapefruit-like proportions and I degenerated into a state of dehydrated delirium, a sweat-bathed figure talking in nonsensical riddles and vomiting for a fortnight at my mum’s house. I lost a load of weight and my head felt like a giant, pulsing boulder

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blue is the warmest color ending explained [6]

”, All smiles: Lea Seydoux (left), director Abdellatif Kechiche and Adele Exarchopoulos in Cannes.Credit:AP. I agree with the almost universal that the ending was horrible
At Cannes, the film shocked some critics with its long and graphic sex scenes (although fake genitalia were used),[80][39] leading them to speculate that it might require editing before screening in cinemas. ‘”[27][30][31], La Seydoux was cast as Emma ten months before principal photography began
While The Past further amazed me about Farhadi’s recent work, I was let down by the winner of Palme d’Or Blue is the Warmest Color. Despite the critical praise the movie received in 2013, its release was somewhat overshadowed by controversies over its production

Blue Is the Warmest Colour [7]

Blue Is the Warmest Colour (French: La Vie d’Adèle – Chapitres 1 & 2, lit. ‘The Life of Adèle: Chapters 1 & 2’; French pronunciation: [la vi dadɛl ʃapitʁ œ̃n‿e dø]) is a 2013 romantic drama film co-written, co-produced, and directed by Abdellatif Kechiche and starring Léa Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulos
It depicts their relationship from Adèle’s high school years to her early adult life and career as a schoolteacher. The film’s premise is based on the 2010 graphic novel of the same name by Jul Maroh.[6]
Approximately 800 hours of footage were shot, including extensive B-roll footage, with Kechiche trimming the final cut to 180 minutes.[7] The film generated controversy,[8] much of it about allegations by the crew and lead actresses of poor working conditions on set and the film’s raw depiction of sexuality.[9][10][11]. At the 2013 Cannes Film Festival, the film unanimously won the Palme d’Or from the official jury and the FIPRESCI Prize

Dive into anything [8]

It felt truly epic in it’s scope, and ruthlessly realistic. I swear I have had conversations and moments of tension that were seemingly ripped from this film
What was the significance of blue? Obviously it is used non-stop in the film (Adele’s entire room, the bench her and her initial boyfriend break up on, Emma’s hair obviously) but what does it actually denote? Is it used simply as a consistent backdrop or does it hold plot-relevant details like orange in the Godfather and red in The Sixth sense? We went back and forth on this a bit but couldn’t find anything consistent throughout, other than blue representing the beginning of their relationship, and red (or the lack of blue, most noticeably in Emma’s hair at her party) representing the downward spiral out.. We both agreed that the relationship was doomed to failure, but we disagreed as to why
Regardless of the circumstances she was dealing with, she shouldn’t have let herself lose control. On the other hand, Emma was emotionally absent, demonstrated by the party seen

Your Film Professor [9]

I have to confess that I wrestled with what to say about the wonderful Blue is the Warmest Color (2013, Abdellatif Kechiche); that is, I knew I wanted to write about it – it is one of those films that stayed with me after I screened it – but every time I sat down to write my thoughts, words eluded me. To break through this I thought I might try a different approach and look at some of the provocative images and intertextual references in the film and comment on them as I go
However, because this film is just so rich in intertextual intersections, I can only get to some of these references here, my hope being that I can interject an analysis that becomes part of the dialectal unpacking of this multilayered film.. In this early wonderful image, Adèle’s reflection not only already informs us of — punctuates visually — her lack of a fixed Self (her fragmented Self), but in the third image of her fading out, we see how fragile identity is, especially for young people, as various influences act to move identity in many different directions, sometimes in unhealthy directions (more on this in a moment).
This sense of disconnect from the world around her — and her Self — is magnified by two key signifiers in this image, the bench itself, which speaks to the place where other people could be (e.g., the void of no people sitting with her gets hyper-emphasized, speaks to the lack of real bonded connections in her life) and that she is sitting perpendicular to the bench suggests that she is already going against the norms of society.. In this important sequence, we get our first stress on the crucial class focus in the film, Adèle seeming to have at least this possibility for a substantive identity formation, the blue motif here (the blue smoke that issues from the cans, apparently their activist color marker) then suggesting another meaning for the color blue, signaling Adèle’s potential for agency and activism in her life, which we see again later when she joins in the LBGTQ rights march, all of which plays into the key Sartrean focus of existentialism, these activist marches signifying a way for Others to enact their own identity and not let other (ideological, cultural, societal, personal) influences dictate Self (more on this crucial element below)

Blue Is The Warmest Color – Overview/ Review (with Spoilers) [10]

Blue Is The Warmest Color – Overview/ Review (with Spoilers). Combining the romantic chemistry of young adult novels, lack of inhibition, a story which feels like a 600-page book you can’t put down, you get Blue is the Warmest Color.
My discovery of this movie came from it being listed amongst 12 Years a Slave as movies to watch out for after the Toronto International Film Festival. Outside of that, though, I wasn’t familiar with anyone involved
Of course, though, like many I’m sure, I also heard about the scenes which if cut, or edited, would easily turn this NC-17 movie into a PG-13, or light R.. The story focuses on a young, doe-eyed, 17-year-old, girl named Adele (played by Adèle Exarchopoulos) who has the type of look and persona which makes her seem like someone whose life is often defined by others

Blue Is the Warmest Color / Analysis [11]

French-Tunisian director Abdellatif Kechiche first wanted to explore the story of a school teacher due to his preoccupations with social class. While he may be aware that he is now a member of the cultural elite in France for being a critically acclaimed French filmmaker in the birthplace of cinema, among its philosophy, culture, and je ne sais quoi, he is very much aware that he is “not French enough” due to his working class roots and his immigrant background
He still sees himself as part of the working class that he lives in the 18th arrondisement of Paris near where the immigrants live. He claims that he is aware that people only embrace his films in spite of his race because he�s very good and because of his unique brand of filmmaking
She can tinker with the lighting and sound, she can even stand as a camera woman or to serve as an assistant for the cinematographer. Kechiche left the camera running between takes so that the actors will deliver a performance that�s so natural that by the time filming starts, they will forget that there�s a camera.

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The Trouble With ‘Blue Is the Warmest Color’ [12]

Specifically, it was the way the camera captured the pretty teenager’s rear end in “Blue Is the Warmest Color” so that it was centered and foregrounded in the frame. It is a lovely derrière, no question, round, compact and firm, and I became well acquainted with how it looked whether tucked into snug jeans or perched prettily in the air when Adèle, who’s 15 when the movie opens, lies splayed sleeping face down in bed, as young children often do
Mind you, I thought the same about Mike Nichols, given the attention he lavished on Natalie Portman’s rear in his 2004 film, “Closer.” This observation was a data point that I stashed in my files, where I’ve also noted that Alfred Hitchcock preferred blondes, and Quentin Tarantino likes pretty feet. For the most part, this information doesn’t factor into my thinking about these filmmakers, even if it is unsettling to hear Tippi Hedren brand Hitchcock as a sexual predator
So I watch, loving movies that don’t necessarily love or even like women.. Kechiche, after all, elevated one such rear into art, or so the consensus was in May at the Cannes Film Festival, where “Blue Is the Warmest Color” won the Palme d’Or

Blue Is the Warmest Color – Movie Review [13]

World premiere: 23 May, 2013, Cannes International Film Festival. The Palme d’Or winner for 2013, Blue Is the Warmest Color, comes with some serious baggage attached
Maybe I’m wrong about that, for certainly the grand scale of time the film covers justifies that kind of epic treatment, but there are a lot of small moments that are… fine, but the difference between a movie that needs to be three hours long and a movie that needn’t aren’t a plethora of “fine” moments.. I am not now and have never been a lesbian, so I really shouldn’t pretend like I have a meaningful opinion on whether the sex scenes staged by a straight male director and two straight female actors are meaningfully true to the lesbian experience, but I’ll say that the complaints by Julie Maroh, author of the source material, that it’s very male gazey seem pretty much spot on, and anyway when a lesbian author looks at the adaptation of her lesbian lovers and tells the world, “that’s not how we do it”, I’m inclined to at least give her the benefit of the doubt.
Which gets back to the three-hour running time, because if there’s one outrageously obvious place to start backing off on that, it’s one of the real-time sex scenes that, by expanding to ten minutes instead of just two or three, only really informs us that Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux are good sports, without actually communicating anything about how sex is experienced by humans that wasn’t already clear. I can think of one plausible justification for this, which I’m going to hold on to for later.

Blue Is the Warmest Color: How is the movie different from the book? [14]

Two-fer Spoiler Alert: In case the headline wasn’t clear enough, this post contains spoilers from the book and the movie versions of Blue Is the Warmest Color.. In a recent conversation about adapting the graphic memoir Fun Home into a musical, playwright Lisa Kron told me, “You can’t translate one thing into another form; you have to make a parallel work … that can exist on its own.” Adaptation is always a process of transformation, so it’s no surprise that Abdellatif Kechiche’s movie version of Blue Is the Warmest Color didn’t use Julie Maroh’s graphic novel as a storyboard
In terms of plotting, the biggest difference is that in the movie, Adèle—she’s Clementine in the book, but Kechiche wanted to use the actress’s name for the character—is still alive at the end. In Maroh’s novel she’s killed by homophobia—well, arterial pulmonary hypertension exacerbated by an addiction to pills that’s indirectly caused by homophobia.
She says, “Ever since that night when I was 17, when I was thrown out of my own house, the night when my father, wild with anger, said to me, ‘If you leave with her, you are no longer my daughter,’ I have not been at peace.”. In the movie, her family is ignorant but loving, and Adèle leaves anti-gay hatred behind once she graduates from high school

Blue Is the Warmest Colour: Why Sex Scenes Were Controversial [15]

When Blue Is The Warmest Colour was released in 2013, it was the talk of just about every film critic. It unanimously won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and took the cinematic world by storm.
Not only was the movie immediately infamous for its graphic sex scenes, but it was revealed that the working conditions on set were brutal and unfair. Director Abdellatif Kechiche was scrutinized for his behavior on set, and allegations of sexual assault were levied against him.
Now, ten years later, the tides have turned on the film. More information has come out regarding the cast and crew’s experiences on set, and lead actresses Léa Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulos have openly expressed their distaste for the ways they were treated.

Review: Love at its finest in ‘Blue Is the Warmest Color’ [16]

Review: Love at its finest in ‘Blue Is the Warmest Color’. The moral of “Blue Is the Warmest Color” is simple: Sex without love is nothing; life without love is even less.
Loosely based on Julie Maroh’s superbly illustrated graphic novel and adapted for the screen by Kechiche and Ghalya Lacroix, it traces the life cycle of a relationship beginning to end. The truth of its emotionally raw, romantic drama is eternal and universal.
It soon intersects with Emma (Léa Seydoux), a college art student. The younger girl wants to teach kindergartners; the older is an emerging painter of some significance

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What really happened on the Blue is the Warmest Colour set [17]

The swirl of hostility, accusations and counter-accusations, retribution and jeering from the wings that has enveloped Blue is the Warmest Colour, the French erotic epic that was the toast of last year’s Cannes Film Festival, makes most of Hollywood’s catfights look pale by comparison. ”Directors and actors being what they are, they like a good argument,” wrote a commentator in a piece comparing the saga with other screen clashes
The film, directed by Abdellatif Kechiche, a French director of Tunisian origin widely regarded as one of French cinema’s small handful of masters, is the story of a great passion between two teenage girls. It traces their affair from flirtation through a bitter break-up and its melancholy aftermath with such force of feeling that you seem to be living their lives yourself.
The thrilled threesome were pictured on the red carpet kissing and hugging. Immediately after the Cannes premiere, a French film technicians’ union criticised Kechiche for his ”disorganised” approach to filming and for making demands on his crew that amounted to ”moral harassment”, a charge he denied

“Blue is the Warmest Color” [18]

Note: this article was published before the author came out as trans and non-binary, and originally referred to them by their birth name and pronouns.. Ten years after its publication, Jul Maroh’s “Blue is the Warmest Color” (“Le bleu est une couleur chaude,” lit
Be aware that there will be spoilers, even if you have seen the film version.. Clementine is a junior in high school who seems average enough: she has friends, family, and the romantic attention of the boys in her school
Their attraction is instant and electric, and Clementine find herself in a relationship that will test her friends, parents, and her own ideas about herself and her identity.. Vividly illustrated and beautifully told, ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’ is a brilliant, bittersweet, full-color graphic novel about the elusive, reckless magic of love

Review: Blue Is the Warmest Color [19]

There is a vivid party scene at the middle of Abdellatif Kechiche’s sprawling Palme d’Or winner Blue Is the Warmest Color (aka, in France, La Vie d’Adèle: Chapitres 1 et 2) that encapsulates some of the film’s strengths and weaknesses. Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos), a young schoolteacher who is feeling her way through early adulthood and her first serious love affair, has earnestly prepared a meal in honor of her artist girlfriend, Emma (Léa Seydoux)
And yet the scene, which also marks a turning point in the central relationship, falters when some of Emma’s supposedly sophisticated friends make eager remarks about art and female sexuality that seem to mirror the director’s problematic approach toward the representation of women.. By now the controversies associated with the film—including Kechiche’s on-again, off-again rifts with his two stellar actresses, partly over a lengthy and explicit sex scene—have been well documented
As in Kechiche’s earlier work, social class, and the divisions it creates, are a vital thread; he even changed the first name of the story’s passionate protagonist from Clémentine to that of his actress, partly because it means “justice” in Arabic. His fascination and familiarity with the world of pedagogy, as shown here in Adèle’s touching reverence for teaching, is another notable characteristic.

Blue Is the Warmest Color :: Review — good OK bad [20]

When I was a young and abysmally unprepared twenty-four-years old, I asked my girlfriend to marry me. She said something along the lines of Sure and Yeah and Okay
Somewhere around a year-and-a-half later, she broke it off and we went our own ways, some of us more reluctantly than others. There was no heat or fire to the self-destruction of our relationship
We were both, I think, made lonely by worlds that didn’t care for our needs so much as they cared for their own.. Maybe that’s the thing that gets in the way of every failed or failing relationship, the inability to find oneself truly at home in the company of another

A Depressed Person’s Failed Review of Blue Is the Warmest Color [21]

A Depressed Person’s Failed Review of Blue Is the Warmest Color. This past month I have been more depressed than maybe any other time in my life
Some days I feel worse than others, and it has gotten a little better very recently, but most days leaving bed feels impossible. Sex isn’t appealing, drugs are only appealing insomuch as they make it easier to fall asleep and stay asleep for more hours than I normally would, I have consistently avoided social interaction as much as possible, I have something like 25 unread emails and I am late for at least 5 deadlines to submit writing to different publications.
I am now experiencing a thing I used to experience a lot when I was living in Los Angeles of having sex with someone then feeling like I would pay any amount of money for them to leave my bedroom immediately so I can take Xanax and stare at my ceiling for an hour then sleep for 15 hours and spend the next day alternating between being awake for 1 hour and sleeping for 2 hours.. I basically don’t eat anymore unless I’m on drugs or unless someone is cooking for me

The Portrayal of Women from the Female Perspective in Julie Maroh’s Graphic Novel Blue Is the Warmest Color [22]

The Portrayal of Women from the Female Perspective in Julie Maroh’s Graphic Novel Blue Is the Warmest Color (). Compared with Marvel and DC’s films based on superhero comics, most of the European comic book adaptations focus on reality, because the original comic book’s subject matter is more serious and profound, realistic content and high literary and artistic determine its target audience for adults rather than young people
A novel in the general sense consists only of words. When readers read the content of a novel, they develop visual imaginations of characters, story scenes, etc
Graphic novel emphasizes visual elements and is a multi-modal discourse in which pictorial symbols and textual symbols coexist. The two static modal symbols—pictorial symbols such as split-screen, close-up, and color, and textual symbols such as dialogue and psychological description—jointly complete the image shaping and meaning construction in graphic novels, providing the source and blueprint for the creation of film adaptations composed of dynamic audiovisual symbols, and providing audiences with diverse ways to experience them

CRITICAL VIEWING: BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR [23]

Blue is the Warmest Color (2013) is a movie that changed the film industry. This movie was considered controversial due to its erotic scenes and taboo storyline
It follows them through multiple years and through separation. This movie has won many awards and recognition for its acting and cinematography
The movie, Blue Is The Warmest Color, is the main subject of this evaluation, and can be found on Netflix.. The movie focuses on a shy 17-year-old high-school girl, Adèle

Blue Is the Warmest Color Movie Review [24]

Heavy French drama with explicit sex, mature themes.. Be honest with yourself and your loved ones about who you are and what you need to be happy
Adele faces some pretty intense peer pressure and homophobia in high school that’s never really resolved except by graduating and moving on.. Adele follows her heart and gives of herself freely to those she feels comfortable with, but she’s always a bit too worried about what others think
Emma is an expressive artist, patient, faithful, and pushes Adele to find a creative outlet for herself. Friends are cliquish or snobby, and some high schoolers exhibit homophobia.

blue is the warmest color ending meaning
24 blue is the warmest color ending meaning Advanced Guide

Sources

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Is_the_Warmest_Colour#:~:text=Emma%20and%20Ad%C3%A8le%20kiss%2C%20but,part%20with%20apologies%20and%20tears.
  2. https://sites.psu.edu/katrinaleap/2014/07/30/critical-viewing-blue-is-the-warmest-color/#:~:text=Blue%20is%20the%20Warmest%20Color%20taught%20us%20that%20accepting%20who,wanted%20people%20to%20accept%20her.
  3. https://www.yourfilmprofessor.com/blue-is-the-warmest-color-exploring-the-intertexual-layers-of-meaning/#:~:text=We%20get%20many%20shots%20of,her%20alienated%20state%20of%20mind%2C
  4. https://blueisthewarmestcolormovie.wordpress.com/why-adele-cheats/#:~:text=When%20Adele%20comes%20home%2C%20she,staying%20out%20late%20with%20Lise.&text=The%20house%20is%20empty.,from%20sex%20and%20now%20intimacy.&text=So%20she%20acts%20out%20by,as%20if%20she%20is%20desirable.
  5. https://www.vice.com/en/article/dpwqj7/blue-is-the-warmest-colour-is-the-film-that-made-me
  6. https://www.perspective.re/how-to/blue-is-the-warmest-color-ending-explained
  7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Is_the_Warmest_Colour
  8. https://www.reddit.com/r/TrueFilm/comments/1rmy8z/i_just_finished_blue_is_the_warmest_colour_and/
  9. https://www.yourfilmprofessor.com/blue-is-the-warmest-color-exploring-the-intertexual-layers-of-meaning/
  10. https://wherever-i-look.com/movies/blue-is-the-warmest-color-overview-review-with-spoilers
  11. https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Analysis/BlueIsTheWarmestColor
  12. https://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/27/movies/the-trouble-with-blue-is-the-warmest-color.html
  13. https://www.alternateending.com/2013/10/chicago-international-film-festival-13-blue-is-the-warmest-color-abdellatif-kechiche-france.html
  14. https://slate.com/human-interest/2013/10/blue-is-the-warmest-color-how-is-the-movie-different-from-the-book.html
  15. https://www.yournextshoes.com/blue-is-the-warmest-colour/
  16. https://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-xpm-2013-oct-24-la-et-mn-blue-warmest-color-review-20131025-story.html
  17. https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/celebrity/what-really-happened-on-the-blue-is-the-warmest-colour-set-20140208-32885.html
  18. http://www.multiversitycomics.com/reviews/blue-is-the-warmest-color/
  19. https://www.filmcomment.com/article/review-blue-is-the-warmest-color-abdellatif-kechiche/
  20. http://goodokbad.com/index.php/reviews/blue_is_the_warmest_color_review
  21. http://thefanzine.com/a-depressed-persons-failed-review-of-blue-is-the-warmest-color/
  22. https://www.scirp.org/journal/paperinformation.aspx?paperid=113393
  23. https://sites.psu.edu/katrinaleap/2014/07/30/critical-viewing-blue-is-the-warmest-color/
  24. https://www.commonsensemedia.org/movie-reviews/blue-is-the-warmest-color

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