26 if i were not alexander i would be diogenes meaning Ultimate Guide

26 if i were not alexander i would be diogenes meaning Ultimate Guide

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Diogenes and Alexander [1]

The meeting of Diogenes of Sinope and Alexander the Great is one of the most discussed anecdotes from philosophical history. The most popular relate it as evidence of Diogenes’ disregard for authority, wealth, and decorum.[1]
The literature and artwork influenced by this story are extensive.[3]. Versions upon versions of the anecdote exist, with the origins of most appearing to be, either directly or indirectly, in the account of the meeting given by Plutarch, whose actual historicity has also been questioned.[3] Several of the embellished versions of the anecdote do not name either one or both of the protagonists, and some indeed substitute Socrates for Diogenes.[4]
Alexander wanted to fulfill a wish for Diogenes and asked him what he desired.[5] As told by Diogenes Laërtius, Diogenes replied, “Stand out of my light.”[6] Plutarch provides a longer version of the story, which begins after Alexander arrives in Corinth:. Thereupon many statesmen and philosophers came to Alexander with their congratulations, and he expected that Diogenes of Sinope also, who was tarrying in Corinth, would do likewise

When Alexander the Great Met Diogenes the Cynic [2]

The ancient Greek philosopher Diogenes, known as the father of Cynicism, has become famous for his many interesting interactions, particularly with famous Greek leader Alexander the Great.. Diogenes the Cynic (also known as Diogenes of Sinope) lived against the norms of ancient Athens
In broad daylight, he would walk the streets while holding a lantern, telling people that he was looking for one honest man. Born in Sinope, the Ionian city along the Black Sea in 412 or 404 BC, he is considered one of the founders of Cynic philosophy, along with Antisthenes and Crates.
Despite his eccentricities, Diogenes was a sage philosopher. His observations about life, politics, and society were amazingly spot-on although they were often expressed in offensive language.

An Encounter to Remember [3]

For centuries of European art, it was one of the most frequently portrayed moments from classical antiquity. Wikimedia Commons includes more than fifty artistic renderings of an apocryphal meeting of the young Alexander of Macedonia (later to be known as “the Great”) and the much older Diogenes of Sinope (later to be known as “the Cynic”).
He can be assumed to have been dressed at the time of the meeting in regal attire befitting his status and to have been accompanied by a retinue of attendants.. Diogenes was the antisocial, ascetic philosopher who lived in a barrel and rejected all of the norms of civilized behavior
It was widely known that he urinated, defecated, and masturbated in public, to show his contempt for the conventions of society. Caricatures of him in later times often included a lighted lamp that he is said to have carried even in the daytime, as he went in futile search for an honest man.

Alexander the Great visits Diogenes in Corinthos 🗽 Memorial – Cycle Routes and Map [4]

Diogenes was an unconventional ancient Greek philosopher noted for having mocked Alexander the Great, both in public and to his face when he visited Corinth in 336 BC, one of the most well-discussed anecdotes from philosophical history. The most popular relate it as evidence of Diogenes’ disregard for honor, wealth, and respect
Alexander wanted to fulfill a wish for Diogenes and asked him what he desired. Diogenes replied “Stand out of my light.” Alexander: “if I were not Alexander the Great, I would like to be Diogenes.”
There he passed his philosophy of Cynicism to Crates, who taught it to Zeno of Citium, who fashioned it into the school of Stoicism, one of the most enduring schools of Greek philosophy.. He begged for a living and often slept in a large ceramic jar in the marketplace

Wikipedia [5]

This article or section may fail to make a clear distinction between fact and fiction. Diogenes (/daɪˈɒdʒɪniːz/ dy-OJ-in-eez; Ancient Greek: Διογένης, romanized: Diogénēs [di.oɡénɛːs]), also known as Diogenes the Cynic (Διογένης ὁ Κυνικός, Diogénēs ho Kynikós) or Diogenes of Sinope, was a Greek philosopher and one of the founders of Cynicism
He was allegedly banished, or fled from, Sinope for debasement of currency. He was the son of the mintmaster of Sinope, and there is some debate as to whether or not he alone had debased the Sinopian currency, whether his father had done this, or whether they had both done it.[2] After his hasty departure from Sinope he moved to Athens where he proceeded to criticize many conventions of Athens of that day
There he passed his philosophy of Cynicism to Crates, who taught it to Zeno of Citium, who fashioned it into the school of Stoicism, one of the most enduring schools of Greek philosophy.. No writings of Diogenes survive, but there are some details of his life from anecdotes (chreia), especially from Diogenes Laërtius’ book Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers and some other sources.[4] Diogenes made a virtue of poverty

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When Alexander the Great Met Diogenes the Cynic [6]

The ancient Greek philosopher Diogenes, known as the father of Cynicism, has become famous for his many interesting interactions, particularly with famous Greek leader Alexander the Great.. Diogenes the Cynic (also known as Diogenes of Sinope) lived against the norms of ancient Athens
In broad daylight, he would walk the streets while holding a lantern, telling people that he was looking for one honest man. Born in Sinope, the Ionian city along the Black Sea in 412 or 404 BC, he is considered one of the founders of Cynic philosophy, along with Antisthenes and Crates.
Despite his eccentricities, Diogenes was a sage philosopher. His observations about life, politics, and society were amazingly spot-on although they were often expressed in offensive language.

An Encounter to Remember [7]

For centuries of European art, it was one of the most frequently portrayed moments from classical antiquity. Wikimedia Commons includes more than fifty artistic renderings of an apocryphal meeting of the young Alexander of Macedonia (later to be known as “the Great”) and the much older Diogenes of Sinope (later to be known as “the Cynic”).
He can be assumed to have been dressed at the time of the meeting in regal attire befitting his status and to have been accompanied by a retinue of attendants.. Diogenes was the antisocial, ascetic philosopher who lived in a barrel and rejected all of the norms of civilized behavior
It was widely known that he urinated, defecated, and masturbated in public, to show his contempt for the conventions of society. Caricatures of him in later times often included a lighted lamp that he is said to have carried even in the daytime, as he went in futile search for an honest man.

Diogenes and Alexander – 779 Words [8]

We will write a custom Essay on Diogenes and Alexander specifically for you for only 9.35/page. Contentment comes with success whereby one feels happy with their current situation in life
Diogenes was a Greek philosopher while Alexander the great was the lordly ruler of the Greek empire.. He had little regard of the basic needs of human beings, choosing to cloth himself with a single blanket, since God had not provided a way for humans to protect themselves from the cold, like he had for the animals (Highet 8)
He had no furniture and slept in a cask that he moved everywhere with, and placed it where he wanted to sleep.. Many people had lived the way he did, mainly the refugees, but he did so by choice, since his teachings emphasized that people should live a natural life, he chose to teach the people by example

Diogenes [9]

“The nude Cynic fears no fire for his tub; if broken, he will make himself a new house to-morrow, or keep it repaired with clamps of lead.”. Diogenes of Sinope (fourth century BC) is too irascible a character not to share some anecdotes about him from the compendium of Diogenes Laertius on the Lives of the Eminent Philosophers
His life, therefore, was lived with extreme simplicity, inured to want, and without shame. It was this determination to follow his own dictates and not adhere to the conventions of society that he was given the epithet “dog,” from which the name “cynic” is derived
Seeing a child drinking from his hands, Diogenes threw away his cup and remarked, “A child has beaten me in plainness of living.” When invited to the house of Plato, he trampled upon his carpet, saying that he thereby trampled on the vanity of Plato, to which Plato retorted “How much pride you expose to view, Diogenes, by seeming not to be proud.” To Plato’s definition of a man as an animal, bipedal and featherless, Diogenes plucked a chicken and declared, “Here is Plato’s man.”. Alexander the Great was reported to have said, “Had I not been Alexander, I should have liked to be Diogenes.” Once, while Diogenes was sunning himself, Alexander came up to him and offered to grant him any request

Diogenes of Sinope [10]

404-323 BCE) was a Greek Cynic philosopher best known for holding a lantern (or candle) to the faces of the citizens of Athens claiming he was searching for an honest man. He rejected the concept of “manners” as a lie and advocated complete truthfulness at all times and under any circumstance.
445-365 BCE, who studied with Socrates) and, in the words of Plato (allegedly), was “A Socrates gone mad.” He was driven into exile from his native city of Sinope for defacing currency (though some sources say it was his father who committed the crime and Diogenes simply followed him into exile). He made a home for himself in Athens in the agora, living in a rain barrel and surviving off gifts from admirers, foraging, and begging.
By holding a literal light up to people’s faces in broad daylight, he forced them to recognize their participation in practices that prevented them from living truthfully. He inspired others to follow his example, most notably Crates of Thebes (l

The Genius Absurdity Of The Greek Philosopher: Diogenes The Cynic [11]

Diogenes of Sinope was the embodiment of his teacher’s cynical way of life. He rejected social norms, politics, and luxury; but instead, promoted multicultural appreciation and communal anarchy
“It is the privilege of the gods to want nothing, and of godlike men to want little.” -Diogenes of Sinope. Diogenes of Sinope (404-323 BCE) is a lesser-known Greek philosopher compared to the likes of Aristotle and Plato
Archival records on the philosopher are few or, if not, completely nonexistent yet his philosophical ideals were so profound that they single handedly cemented him in the history books.. Diogenes was unique among this fellow Grecian philosophers

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Diogenes the Cynic (c.404-323 BC) [12]

You’ve read one of your four complimentary articles for this month.. To have complete access to the thousands of philosophy articles on this site, please
Socrates notoriously never wrote anything down, but we at least have dialogues written by his contemporaries Plato and Xenophon claiming to record what he said. Diogenes may or may not have written something: later sources quote the titles of lost works attributed to him
But he had no contemporary recorder of his thoughts. We have to reconstruct his life and ideas from quotations and anecdotes in sources long after his lifetime

Plutarch, Alexander, chapter 14 [13]

And now a general assembly of the Greeks was held at the Isthmus, 1 where a vote was passed to make an expedition against Persia with Alexander, and he was proclaimed their leader. Thereupon many statesmen and philosophers came to him with their congratulations, and he expected that Diogenes of Sinope also, who was tarrying in Corinth, would do likewise
Diogenes raised himself up a little when he saw so many persons coming towards him, and fixed his eyes upon Alexander. And when that monarch addressed him with greetings, and asked if he wanted anything, ‘Yes,’ said Diogenes, ‘stand a little out of my sun.’ [3] It is said that Alexander was so struck by this, and admired so much the haughtiness and grandeur of the man who had nothing but scorn for him, that he said to his followers, who were laughing and jesting about the philosopher as they went away, ‘But verily, if I were not Alexander, I would be Diogenes.’ [4] And now, wishing to consult the god concerning the expedition against Asia, he went to Delphi; and since he chanced to come on one of the inauspicious days, when it is not lawful to deliver oracles, in the first place he sent a summons to the prophetess
[5] Moreover, when he set out upon his expedition, 2 it appears that there were many signs from heaven, and, among them, the image of Orpheus at Leibethra (it was made of cypress-wood) sweated profusely at about that time. Most people feared the sign, but Aristander bade Alexander be of good cheer, assured that he was to perform deeds worthy of song and story, which would cost poets and musicians much toil and sweat to celebrate

Following Diogenes: Cynic Leadership in Plutarch and Beyond [14]

Plutarch treats the legendary meeting of Alexander the Great and Diogenes the Cynic in detail no fewer than three times. Given the popularity of this anecdote, starting already with Cicero (Tusc
What I investigate in this paper is how he presents the meeting in different contexts. Plutarch’s engagement with this larger-than- life moment ultimately constitutes, I argue, a reflection on the problems and potential of Cynic leadership.
When the two meet Diogenes, of course, asks Alexander to get out of his light. Unlike his companions, who make fun of the philosopher, Alexander ‘was affected and astonished’, saying that ‘if he were not Alexander, he would be Diogenes’ (Alex

Alexander the Great visits Diogenes in Corinthos 🗽 Memorial – Cycle Routes and Map [15]

Diogenes was an unconventional ancient Greek philosopher noted for having mocked Alexander the Great, both in public and to his face when he visited Corinth in 336 BC, one of the most well-discussed anecdotes from philosophical history. The most popular relate it as evidence of Diogenes’ disregard for honor, wealth, and respect
Alexander wanted to fulfill a wish for Diogenes and asked him what he desired. Diogenes replied “Stand out of my light.” Alexander: “if I were not Alexander the Great, I would like to be Diogenes.”
There he passed his philosophy of Cynicism to Crates, who taught it to Zeno of Citium, who fashioned it into the school of Stoicism, one of the most enduring schools of Greek philosophy.. He begged for a living and often slept in a large ceramic jar in the marketplace

Four ancient truths to help you lead a modern life [16]

You may well know someone — you, perhaps? — who is stoic, epicurean, skeptical or cynical.. That’s because these four adjectives represent philosophical and psychological shortcuts for coping with a confusing, frustrating and even infuriating world, just as they did when they came into use more than two millennia ago
The terms first bubbled up at a time that was, in a psychological sense, remarkably similar to our own. This was the so-called Hellenistic or Greek-like period, which lasted about three centuries, from Alexander the Great, who died in 323 BC, to the Roman Emperor Augustus.
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Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies [17]

Diogenes and the End of the Polis: Philosophy in the Shadow of Empires. After Aristotle a radically new spirit comes to dominate ancient philosophy, and with hindsight it is remarkable how swiftly the change takes place
This whole new era, from roughly 323 BCE and the conquest of Greece and the Near East by Alexander the Great down through roughly 300 CE when the Roman Empire becomes officially Christian, has a distinctly different character and culture and a distinctly different set of political problems than the period of the classical polis. The next 600 years are dominated by the rise of large scale empires.
The three major schools are Stoicism, Epicurianism and Cynicism. All of them were united in rejecting the dualism (even in its modified Aristotelian form) between a real, transcendent world of intelligible, permanent, unchanging forms superior to the shifting, unreliable world of sense experience

8 Lesser-Known Facts About Alexander the Great [18]

Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, became king at the age of twenty and had conquered most of the known world by the time of his sudden death at 32. During his brief but eventful reign, he created a vast Empire that stretched from Greece and Egypt all the way to India
Following the conqueror’s passing, his huge Empire disintegrated in the wars waged by his successors. Even so, Alexander’s lasting legacy — the Hellenistic World — endured, influencing virtually every society and culture up to the present day
Here are eight lesser-known facts about the king, general, conqueror, and legend — Alexander the Great.. Alexander the Great Was a Member of an Ancient Dynasty

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Diogenes and Alexander the Great [19]

Diogenes is considered to be one of the most controversial figures in history. One of the founders of Cynicism, a philosophical school of thought, Diogenes advocated for poverty and shamelessness, rejecting conventional desires for money, authority, power, and wealth, along with the importance of socio-economic status
He lived between 412-323 BC, at the same time as Alexander the Great, who was born in 336. Alexander the Great was a king of Macedon, the ancient Greek kingdom
To some extent, these two historical figures are opposites of each other in terms of their personal qualities, values, lifestyles, and legacy.. Diogenes had been taking the philosophy of Cynicism to extremes, leading a very simplistic lifestyle

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy [20]

From Thales, who is often considered the first Western philosopher, to the Stoics and Skeptics, ancient Greek philosophy opened the doors to a particular way of thinking that provided the roots for the Western intellectual tradition. Here, there is often an explicit preference for the life of reason and rational thought
With Socrates comes a sustained inquiry into ethical matters—an orientation towards human living and the best life for human beings. With Plato comes one of the most creative and flexible ways of doing philosophy, which some have since attempted to imitate by writing philosophical dialogues covering topics still of interest today in ethics, political thought, metaphysics, and epistemology
He wrote treatises on each of these topics, as well as on the investigation of the natural world, including the composition of animals. The Hellenists—Epicurus, the Cynics, the Stoics, and the Skeptics—developed schools or movements devoted to distinct philosophical lifestyles, each with reason at its foundation.

A Dog’s Life [21]

Diogenes was a Cynic, a group of philosophers in Hellenistic times (c. 323-146 BCE) that dropped out of conventional society much like modern-day hippies
In this story we explore the notion of freedom and happiness and its relationship to material gain or wealth. Many feel that happiness is best achieved through having the means to attain what you want and thereby the ability to satisfy your desires
In other words: if all I want is some bread and water then it would be relatively easy (on the whole) to get bread and water and therefore easier to be happy. But then, one could argue that someone like Diogenes has responsibilities that follow from his wealth, such as the welfare of his family and servants and the good that could be done with his wealth

The Story of Alexander and Diogenes – Middleburg Life [22]

Among the paintings on display at the National Sporting Library & Museum in the exhibition Identity & Restraint: Art of the Dog Collar is one titled “Alexander and Diogenes.” The original was by Sir Edwin Landseer; first shown at the Royal Academy in London in 1848, it now hangs in the Tate Gallery. The one in the exhibition at the NSLM originated from Landseer’s studio.
The snarling dog inside the barrel represents Diogenes, the Greek philosopher. In reality, at one period during his life Diogenes did reside in a large clay vessel
In the painting, the lantern in the lower left depicts the one he would carry in daylight in search of an honest man. Beside it are a few simple tools representing self-reliance, and potatoes representing his sparse diet

The Living Philosophy of Diogenes the Cynic [23]

Diogenes of Sinope was a contemporary of Plato and Alexander the Great. He was famous for his radical philosophy that discarded status, possessions and the learning of books to get at the vital marrow of philosophy — the good life.
He didn’t care for the intellectual search for truth but the living of it. For Diogenes this meant living in an urn in the Athenian marketplace; it meant sometimes walking barefoot in the snow and, of course occasionally masturbating in public.
In modern English, when we talk about the highest goal of life, we tend to use the word happiness. And obviously, when we use this word, it comes with associations of positive affect and happy feelings of joy and peace.

Diogenes: the crazy, nudist Greek philosopher who insulted Alexander the Great [24]

Imagine living in a ceramic jar, begging for food and money on the streets, and walking around naked in public.. This is the life of Diogenes, an ancient Greek philosopher who lived in the 4th century BCE.
He was a radical thinker who believed in living a simple and honest life, free from the constraints of society.. But you won’t believe what happened the greatest general of the ancient world sought him out one day…
His father, Hicesias, was a banker, and his family was believed to be relatively wealthy.. According to one legend, Diogenes’ father was accused of debasing the currency, and as a result, the family was forced to leave Sinope and seek refuge elsewhere.

Diogenes of Sinope [25]

Diogenes of Sinope is the great exemplar whom later Cynics continually evoke. Yet despite the many vivid anecdotes told of him, he is historically a shadowy figure, and his ideas are difficult to pinpoint with absolute precision
While there may be a general consensus on these topics, controversies remain, and perhaps must remain. In its second section, therefore, the chapter explores diverse, even opposite ways in which Diogenes has been construed and categorized
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Diogenes [26]

He was allegedly banished, or fled from, Sinope for debasement of currency. He was the son of the mintmaster of Sinope, and there is some debate as to whether or not he alone had debased the Sinopian currency, whether his father had done this, or whether they had both done it.[2] After his hasty departure from Sinope he moved to Athens where he proceeded to criticize many conventions of Athens of that day
There he passed his philosophy of Cynicism to Crates, who taught it to Zeno of Citium, who fashioned it into the school of Stoicism, one of the most enduring schools of Greek philosophy.. No writings of Diogenes survive, but there are some details of his life from anecdotes (chreia), especially from Diogenes Laërtius’ book Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers and some other sources.[4] Diogenes made a virtue of poverty
He had a reputation for sleeping and eating wherever he chose in a highly non-traditional fashion and took to toughening himself against nature. He declared himself a cosmopolitan and a citizen of the world rather than claiming allegiance to just one place.

if i were not alexander i would be diogenes meaning
26 if i were not alexander i would be diogenes meaning Ultimate Guide

Sources

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diogenes_and_Alexander
  2. https://greekreporter.com/2022/12/22/alexander-great-diogenes-philosophy/#:~:text=Thrilled%20to%20meet%20the%20famous,is%20known%20across%20the%20world.
  3. https://kosmossociety.chs.harvard.edu/an-encounter-to-remember/#:~:text=Although%20Alexander’s%20attendants%20took%20umbrage,would%20want%20to%20be%20Diogenes.%E2%80%9D
  4. https://www.komoot.com/highlight/651785#:~:text=According%20to%20legend%2C%20Alexander%20the,would%20like%20to%20be%20Diogenes.%22
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diogenes#:~:text=Diogenes%20taught%20by%20living%20example,also%20property%20rights%20and%20reputation.
  6. https://greekreporter.com/2022/12/22/alexander-great-diogenes-philosophy/
  7. https://kosmossociety.chs.harvard.edu/an-encounter-to-remember/
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  12. https://philosophynow.org/issues/149/Diogenes_the_Cynic_c404-323_BC
  13. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:abo:tlg,0007,047:14
  14. https://classicalstudies.org/following-diogenes-cynic-leadership-plutarch-and-beyond
  15. https://www.komoot.com/highlight/651785
  16. https://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2023/01/02/commentary/world-commentary/greek-philosophers/
  17. http://www.yorku.ca/horowitz/courses/lectures/17_diogenes_polis.html
  18. https://www.thecollector.com/alexander-the-great-facts/
  19. https://studycorgi.com/diogenes-and-alexander-the-great/
  20. https://iep.utm.edu/ancient-greek-philosophy/
  21. https://www.philosophy-foundation.org/enquiries/view/a-dog-s-life
  22. https://www.middleburglife.com/the-story-of-alexander-and-diogenes/
  23. https://www.thelivingphilosophy.com/the-living-philosophy-of-diogenes/
  24. https://www.historyskills.com/classroom/ancient-history/diogenes/
  25. https://academic.oup.com/book/33502/chapter/287819554
  26. https://profilpelajar.com/article/Diogenes

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