11 rich man’s war poor man’s fight meaning Advanced Guide

11 rich man’s war poor man’s fight meaning Advanced Guide

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THE CIVIL WAR: A “POOR MAN’S FIGHT?” [1]

The Civil War has often been described as a “rich man’s war-poor man’s fight,” suggesting that the war was waged with disproportionate human losses to the lower class. The losses suffered by the nation were huge, but the charge that such losses were disproportionately born by the poor or the immigrants as a result of some Intentional discrimination makes such losses even more tragic and unjustified
In 1863, the debate was highly partisan, with the Democratic party accusing the current Republican majority and administration of discriminating against the poorer classes by Instituting commutation. Today, the debate continues In history texts and other academic circles.
Although the approach differs with each study, an interesting methodological issue seems consistent throughout. Those studies which argue in favor of the traditional view of the war as a “poor man’s fight” use as support, personal interpretation based upon the Enrollment Act, congressional debates, and public opinion of Civil War contemporaries

Was the Civil War Really a Rich Man’s War, Poor Man’s Fight? [2]

A common maxim during the Civil War held that it was “a rich man’s war but a poor man’s fight.” Both Union and Confederate critics leveled this charge—especially in the wake of conscription. But was that the case? Did the poorer classes of Union and the Confederacy bear the burden of fighting while the rich remained at home? The answer is more complicated than a simple yes or no.
Approximately 240,000 soldiers served in General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia (although the average at any given time ranged between 35,000 and 90,000).
Most of the soldiers on both sides were in their teens or early twenties when the war began. Single men—those with the fewest ties to keep them at home—were the most likely to rush off to war in 1861.

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A New Home For Adams County History [3]

The casualty lists were published soon after the Battle of Gettysburg, and the numbers were staggering. Never before had there been so many killed, wounded, and missing in one battle.
It was also the place of a large immigrant populace – especially the Irish, who were mostly laborers with little money and little hope to escape the insistence of the draft. To make matters worse for Abraham Lincoln and his determination to keep soldiers fighting in the fields, New York was largely a Democratic stronghold
Governor Horatio Seymour considered the draft unconstitutional, and promised the people that he would disobey it. Yet, when the need for more soldiers arose, he reneged on his promise and allowed the draft to take place.1

The Civil War: ‘A rich man’s battle but a poor man’s war’ [4]

March 26, 2012 — It was often said of the Civil War that it was a “rich man’s battle” but a “poor man’s war.” This saying applied to both sides equally, but as usual, the devil was in the details.. When the War first broke out, patriotism and patriotic fervor was high in both camps
Prior to the Conscription Act of 1863, and after the first blush of getting a gun and shooting the Rebels or the Yankees, had ebbed, it was an easy matter to decline military service.. It quickly became a sticking point in the North, where the district one lived and registered in basically determined who would be drafted and who would not
They had become part of what was seen as forced servitude.. The shouts of “rich man’s war and poor man’s fight” was the rallying cry which saw thousands of eligible men take to the streets in riotous protests

“Rich Man’s War and a Poor Man’s Fight“ [5]

According to David Nasaw, a history professor at the City University of New York, after having received his draft notice to report for military service during the Civil War Andrew Carnegie, the billionaire rail and steel magnate, paid an Irish immigrant $850 to fight in his place.(1) Needless to say, Carnegie was by no means unique in his unwillingness to serve, as “draft dodging” was a common practice among the wealthy.. “A large number of the men of his generation, who would later be referred to as ‘robber barons,’ including Phillip Armour, Jay Cooke, J.P
Rockefeller spent the war as he did, making money by providing the Union Armies with fuel, uniforms, shoes, rifles, ammunitions, provisions, transportation and financing.”(2). Nor was it illegal: The Conscription (Enrollment) Act, passed by Congress in 1863 to address a manpower shortage in the Union Army, allowed an exemption from military service to those who either paid a “commutation fee” of $300 or, like Carnegie, hired a substitute
As a consequence, those who were “condemned to serve,” and perhaps to die, viewed their conscription as forced servitude in a “rich man’s war and a poor man’s fight,” the rallying cry that mobilized thousands to take to the streets in protest. During one such uprising, the 1863 New York Draft Riots, some 2,000 protesters were killed and 8,000 injured, according to one estimate.

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Was the Civil War Really a Rich Man’s War, Poor Man’s Fight? [6]

A common maxim during the Civil War held that it was “a rich man’s war but a poor man’s fight.” Both Union and Confederate critics leveled this charge—especially in the wake of conscription. But was that the case? Did the poorer classes of Union and the Confederacy bear the burden of fighting while the rich remained at home? The answer is more complicated than a simple yes or no.
Approximately 240,000 soldiers served in General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia (although the average at any given time ranged between 35,000 and 90,000).
Most of the soldiers on both sides were in their teens or early twenties when the war began. Single men—those with the fewest ties to keep them at home—were the most likely to rush off to war in 1861.

Was the American Revolution a ‘Rich Man’s War but a Poor Man’s Fight?’ [7]

Historians have long found it easy to explain the reaction of colonial elites to Britain’s imperial reforms in the Revolutionary era. This is because scholars could point to the specific ways imperial reforms threatened elite families’ economic interests, commercial enterprises, and political dominance in the colonies
Yet if the Revolution served the interests and ambitions of elite families who led the Revolution, what explains the broad support they enjoyed from below (from lower- and middle-class colonists)? Indeed, many Americans – students, teachers, and historians – struggle to explain what moved common people to make common cause with colonial elites. Why did ordinary Americans – people who did not sit in the assemblies, and in most cases, did not even vote for representatives – care about and feel threatened by policies that Parliament initiated in the realm of high-politics?
Historians deploy this explanation repeatedly to make sense of the baffling habit of average Americans to follow the lead of their wealthier countrymen in various national projects. Thus, the concept of “a rich man’s war, but a poor man’s fight” has been applied to the US Civil War, World War I, the Vietnam War, the Cold War, and to a host of non-military endeavors

Wealth, Slaveownership, and Fighting for the Confederacy: An Empirical Study of the American Civil War [8]

Civil wars are pervading features of human society, despite their profound costs. Between World War II and the new millennium alone, there were over 70 civil wars resulting in more than 16 million deaths worldwide (Fearon and Laitin Reference Fearon and Laitin2003)
Underlying the macro-level phenomena of civil wars are the individual decisions of millions of people to participate in these violent conflicts.Footnote 1 What leads someone to abandon the political process and take up arms against the state, risking personal life, property, and security for uncertain gains? In this article we study this question in the context of the American Civil War, one of the most destructive civil wars ever fought and “the most horrific war in United States history” (Costa and Kahn Reference Costa and Kahn2003, 520). Motivated by historical research on this defining period in America’s development and insights from conflict studies about why individuals participate in rebellions, this article investigates how personal wealth and slaveownership affected the likelihood that Southerners fought for the Confederate Army in the American Civil War
Research drawn from political science and history offers countervailing views on whether wealth, in various forms, should increase or decrease the propensity to fight. On the one hand, one of the most famous historical sayings about the American Civil War was that it was “a rich man’s war, but a poor man’s fight.”Footnote 2 The saying captures the claim that poorer white southern men, most of whom did not own slaves, were more likely to fight in the Confederate Army than their wealthier slaveowning peers

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4. Countermemory I: “A Rich Man’s War and a Poor Man’s Fight” [9]

Countermemory I: “A Rich Man’s War and a Poor Man’s Fight””. Hardhats, Hippies, and Hawks: The Vietnam Antiwar Movement as Myth and Memory
In Hardhats, Hippies, and Hawks: The Vietnam Antiwar Movement as Myth and Memory. Countermemory I: “A Rich Man’s War and a Poor Man’s Fight”
Countermemory I: “A Rich Man’s War and a Poor Man’s Fight”” In Hardhats, Hippies, and Hawks: The Vietnam Antiwar Movement as Myth and Memory. Countermemory I: “A Rich Man’s War and a Poor Man’s Fight”

Rich Man’s War [10]

Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley. Published with the generous support of Historic Chattahoochee Commission
Class, Caste, and Confederate Defeat in the Lower Chattahoochee Valley. In Rich Man’s War historian David Williams focuses on the Civil War experience of people in the Chattahoochee River Valley of Georgia and Alabama to illustrate how the exploitation of enslaved blacks and poor whites by a planter oligarchy generated overwhelming class conflict across the South, eventually leading to Confederate defeat.
After the war, however, the upper classes encouraged enmity between freedpeople and poor whites to prevent a class revolution. Trapped by racism and poverty, the poor remained in virtual economic slavery, still dominated by an almost unchanged planter elite.

Interview: A Rich Man’s War, A Poor Man’s Fight [11]

Interview: A Rich Man’s War, A Poor Man’s FightHistorians in the News. tags: civil rights, interviews, Southern history, labor history, working class history
frank X Payday | One thing that I think is written out of the way we look at the South is that there’s a long history of resistance of white southerners.. Whether it is Appalachian foothills or parts of the deep South, many whites were either pro-union or were anti-Confederates
One book that has been instructive for me is the People’s History of the Civil War. Du Bois says, which is that the largest labor strike in US history was when people walked off the plantation, and the second largest was when the Confederate army deserted.

rich man's war poor man's fight meaning
11 rich man’s war poor man’s fight meaning Advanced Guide

Sources

  1. http://jur.byu.edu/?p=10403#:~:text=Introduction,losses%20to%20the%20lower%20class.
  2. https://www.historynet.com/did-the-poor-really-fight-the-civil-war/#:~:text=A%20common%20maxim%20during%20the,in%20the%20wake%20of%20conscription.
  3. https://www.thegettysburgexperience.com/the-new-york-draft-riots#:~:text=The%20new%20law%20also%20specified,%2C%20a%20poor%20man’s%20fight.%E2%80%9D
  4. https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/dec/31/civil-war-rich-mans-battle-poor-mans-war/
  5. https://truthout.org/articles/rich-mans-war-and-a-poor-mans-fight/
  6. https://www.historynet.com/did-the-poor-really-fight-the-civil-war/
  7. https://startingpointsjournal.com/was-the-american-revolution-a-rich-mans-war-but-a-poor-mans-fight/
  8. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/american-political-science-review/article/wealth-slaveownership-and-fighting-for-the-confederacy-an-empirical-study-of-the-american-civil-war/5197A38881BAE7EB2F1C39D43DF3AC7E
  9. https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.7591/9780801467813-006/html
  10. https://ugapress.org/book/9780820320335/rich-mans-war
  11. https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/179738

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